facebook holdout

I have labeled myself as a facebook holdout. I hear others say, “Everyone is on Facebook.” Which makes me question who everyone is? Is everyone on facebook? I know lots of people are. The latest figures exceed 50 million active users. 40 billion pages are viewed daily. 11% of users are over 35 and the fastest growing demographic is the over 30 population. I think that includes me.

On February 4th, 2004 Mark Zuckerberg launched The Facebook, a social network that was at the time exclusively for Harvard students. It was a huge hit: in 2 weeks, half of the schools in the Boston area began demanding a Facebook network. Zuckerberg immediately recruited his friends Dustin Moskowitz and Chris Hughes to help build Facebook, and within four months, Facebook added 30 more college networks. Today the social network is valued at $6 billion.

But I’m still not on facebook. I have even filled out the registration page two different times but never activated my account. I’m a holdout.

Here’s where I’m coming from. It comes down to a single issue, from my perspective. How is facebook able to save me time and enhance my ability to do effective ministry? My life is already overfilled with demands and responsibilities. I don’t need something new to take up my time. I need something that will save me time and increase effectiveness.

Meanwhile, I hear people all the time talking about this new social disease called “facebook addiction.” I don’t need another addiction. And I’m not interested in ease-dropping on the personal details of people’s everyday life. When people want me to know about something significant happening in their life they call me or email or text me. They might even do the unheard of and arrive in person. The crucial stuff already gets to me. And I’m not into fads. I don’t do something just because everyone else is doing it.

So I need your help. In fact I would like to begin a dialogue. Share with me how you think it would be a benefit for me to get on facebook when it comes to saving time and enhancing ministry. And I have to caution you. I will respond when I feel it necessary to do so. I would even like to hear from those of you who are not on facebook. Why are you holding out too?

I really do want to get on facebook but the verdict is still out on the time saving and value it can bring to my life. That’s where I need your help. Now, if I had teens I would have been one of the first ones to sign up, but I’m not there either.

So help me on this one.

Oh, I forgot to mention. I’m even reading a book on how to use facebook in ministry. Maybe that will push me over the edge.

Advertisements

25 thoughts on “facebook holdout

  1. I personally think that you are right. Stay as far away from Facebook as possible. It is for the young, and young at heart.

    No, but seriously, you know how I feel about the Facebook. I love being able to see what is going on in people’s lives. I love being able to post something that is going on in my life, and have my friends and close companions comment about it. I cannot tell you how many times I have posted something even on Sunday morning, and had multiple people from NVCC come up to me and ask me about it.

    I think that the best reason to get involved with it is because it is where your people are. It is a simple, yet effective way to get involved in the lives of others as well as letting them get involved in yours.

    Holla back.

  2. Facebook is about finding people you’ve lost track of. And, son, we’ve lost track of more people than you’ve ever met. Remember who you went to prom with junior year? See, we don’t. We’ve gone through multiple schools, jobs and marriages. Each one of those came with a complete cast of characters, most of whom we have forgotten existed. But Facebook never forgets.

    Facebook isn’t just a social network; it’s a business network. And unlike, say, college students, we actually have jobs. What’s the point of networking with people who can’t hire you? Not that we’d want to work with anyone your age anyway. Given the recession — and the amount of time we spend on Facebook — a bunch of hungry, motivated young guns is the last thing we need around here.

    We’re too old to remember e-mail addresses. You have to understand: we have spent decades drinking diet soda out of aluminum cans. That stuff catches up with you. We can’t remember friends’ e-mail addresses. We can barely remember their names.

    We don’t understand Twitter. Literally. It makes no sense to us.

    We’re not cool, and we don’t care. There was a time when it was cool to be on Facebook. That time has passed. Facebook now has 150 million members, and its fastest-growing demographic is 30 and up. At this point, it’s way cooler not to be on Facebook. We’ve ruined it for good, just like we ruined Twilight and skateboarding. So git! And while you’re at it, you damn kids better get off our lawn too.

  3. Okay. Here’s the deal. I have expressed my opinion about why I think FB (Facebook) is helpful. So instaed of repeating the same ole, same ole….I’ll make a new point. If you have time to write a blog post about why you are a Facebook holdout, read a book about Facebook in ministry, had many conversations about the pros &cons, register for it twice, research FB stats & history and read however many responses come in about people’s opinions about it…seriously Steve, if you had just signed up for Facebook to begin with you could have saved yourself so much TIME! So, from one type A personality to another, “Don’t overanalyze it. Put it to the test! Just give it a shot; see if it saves you time and increases your effectiveness. If not, then close you account. No big deal!”
    Stepping off the soapbox now, Abbey

    • i must say that is an interesting observation. i am curious though, and i would like anyone to respond to this, how much time do you average each day on facebook. the time issue is a real one and i would like to hear from users. when you respond would you also give yourself a classification that would help me? do you consider yourself to be a light, moderate or heavy user?

      • Some days are light or none at all, some are moderate, it all depends. Doesn’t dumb down friends, it’s just another way to communicate with people, whether they be friends, acquaintances or contacts.

  4. BTW, I have a hunch John Doe is really waYne in disguise.

  5. … follow Nancy Reagan & “just say no.” It is the pointless-presented-as-meaningful. It is the idea of ‘connection’ that in reality is mostly the surface appearance, of connection. It serves well to keep people in isolation, from relationship – but encourages them to believe they are really interacting.

    So you can tell I’m a big fan. 🙂

    • that brings up another question or concern i have. does facebook “dumb down” the definition of “friend?” i thought friends were people we associated with on a personal level. but on facebook we can be friends and never do anything more than send cyber messages back and forth. is there a better word to describe them, maybe “contacts” but that sounds so cold.

      • In the end, any means of communication will certainly have genuine value, in some aspect. Mass-immediate communication / publication, more so. It is the isolation & distance that these resources can create in peoples lives that is the travesty. Someone could be falling apart spiritually / emotionally / etc – & their “friends” would never know it, unless that person volunteered the insight.

        Facebook is irrelevant, in that all of these (& any) resources allow for good use — but for the most part end up being buffers for people to keep others at a safe distance, while allowing themselves to feel that they are legitimately connecting w/ others in some measure of open vulnerability.

        I would venture to say more people use these resources to present an “image” of themselves that they can control … than a means of simply better communicating w/ or feeding close relationships. – td

  6. … & that’s what you call ironic

  7. It can be useful in communicating some things … but agree with Tim in that I don’t consider a way to really know each other a whole lot; but you can find out little things about what people are doing.

    General purpose stuff make sense.
    Want to share something short instead of a whole blogpost? Might be worthwhile. Can share pictures easily. Awhile back a couple in our church needed to find another place to rent and there was a fair set of people chiming in trying to help them… so there is some value to it.

    There are MANY who spend way too much time on it. Just like Twitter. And blogging. And texting. I’m on Facebook and use it somewhat. You’ll probably find people more likely to comment on stuff than from blog posts though.

  8. now i can get my arms around something like that.

  9. I find that Facebook is a way to keep up with my friends (locally and far away). Facebook is a way to communicate with them and to see how they are doing on a regular basis. Granted I always like seeing someone in person and talking with them that way or if not that then by phone, but Facebook is the next best thing. I find Facebook a way to regularly share my life with others who I may not get to see on a regular basis.

    The USA and other major countries are more electronic (facebook, other social networks, texting, e-books, internet (electronic) conferences, etc.) than ever before and is changing the way people communicate. I have read many articles that tell job seekers to use the electronic social networks to get a job or use texting to inquire about buying a house. If we want to communicate to other people we need to use the communication channels they are using.

  10. Not a fan- don’t have one myself. I like to talk to, e-mail or imagine -spend time with all the people I love in my life. Not many people in my past have I a need to locate. I am sure for you it may be helpful to keep in touch with members of your other church’s, high school, college, etc.
    I have several friends that do use it and are constantly talking about what’s on the other persons page and it appears to me more of a high schooler’s thing— just like my space.com. Not a fan of that either- we have one but probably don’t visit it once a month if that. Guess we are not computer people, huh?

  11. Depends on what you plan on putting on Facebook. If it’s just stuff for the current church members, then no–leave it alone, it’s a time killer. If you want to put messages out there for people who search keywords like “Christian” or “Jesus” or whatever, then you could use it to post messages broad enough to help someone half-way across the world. So, first you have to decide for what and for whom you would use this piece of technology…

  12. While my son was dying of cancer, I connected with 15 or 20 former church member friends of mine from Vassar Road Baptist Church in Poughkeepsie NY. I had not been to that church since 1987, but still had a friend or two there.

    One friend led to another, and before I knew it, old friends from VRBC who now live all over the U.S. were my ‘FaceBook’ friends.

    They sent me love, prayers and support that I would have never received from them, if we had not re-connected on FaceBook several months ago.

    It was truly a blessing…..

    Judy Schiavone

    • that is a tremendous use of facebook. it is helping you get through one of the most difficult times in life.

  13. I love how everyone is saying something about Facebook.

    Surely you cannot develop a deep intimate bond with anyone over Facebook, but what can happen that I think many people are missing is the INITIAL contact with those people that we are trying to love on and care for.

    If there is no INITIAL contact, then there is NO CONTACT.

    Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

  14. In the end, any means of communication will certainly have genuine value, in some aspect. Mass-immediate communication / publication, more so. It is the isolation & distance that these resources can create in peoples lives that is the travesty. Someone could be falling apart spiritually / emotionally / etc – & their “friends” would never know it, unless that person volunteered the insight.

    Facebook is irrelevant, in that all of these (& any) resources allow for good use — but for the most part end up being buffers for people to keep others at a safe distance, while allowing themselves to feel that they are legitimately connecting w/ others in some measure of open vulnerability.

    I would venture to say more people use these resources to present an “image” of themselves that they can control … than a means of simply better communicating w/ or feeding close relationships. – td

  15. Pingback: thoughts on social media « Show me the path where I should walk, O Lord

  16. Pingback: fondos

  17. Only wanna input that you have a very decent internet site, I like the layout it really stands out.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s